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A Journal of Crime, Conflict & World Order

Art, Identity, and Social Justice

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Vol. 34, No. 1 (2007)

This issue of Social Justice examines the role of various media -- the visual arts, theater, and performance -- in the social justice struggles of communities as diverse as American Indians, Bahamians, North American and Mexican feminists, working-class women in England, and LGBTQ communities of color in New York City and the San Francisco Bay Area. Although the authors explore the arts in a wide range of geographic locations and historical contexts, the articles in this issue on art and social justice each address identity and difference within contested relationships of power and structural inequality. Situated around various lines of identity and difference -- race, class, gender, sexuality, and nation -- the essays converge along thematic grounds characterized by a commitment to emancipatory struggles and progressive social change.

ISSN: 1043-1578. Published quarterly by Social Justice, P.O. Box 40601, San Francisco, CA 94140. SocialJust@aol.com.

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Editors: Emmanuel A. David and Edward J. McCaughan

Emmanuel David and Ed McCaughan: Editors' Introduction

Maria X. Martinez: The Art of Social Justice

Victoria Foster: The Art of Empathy: Employing the Arts in Social Inquiry with Poor, Working-Class Women

Joanna Gardner-Huggett: The Women Artists’ Cooperative Space as a Site for Social Change: Artemisia Gallery, Chicago (1973-1979)

Edward J. McCaughan: Navigating the Labyrinth of Silence: Feminist Artists in Mexico

Cynthia Fowler: Hybridity as a Strategy for Self-Determination in Contemporary American Indian Art

Ian Gregory Strachan: Theater in the Bush: Art, Politics, and Community in the Bahamas

Amy Jo Goddard: Staging Activism: New York City Performing Artists as Cultural Workers

D. Mark Wilson: Post-Pomo Hip-Hop Homos: Hip-Hop Art, Gay Rappers, and Social Change

Alejandra Osorio: Postcards in the Porfirian Imaginary